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February 08, 2003

Chub Cay and on to Nassau!

February 7th and 8th, 2003
We moved from Chub Cay this morning to the Northeast side of Frazer’s Hog Cay and anchored all by ourselves in another beautiful setting. We spent the day loafing around and took the dinghy to explore the Cay. It turns out that these Cays are volcanic in origin as you can see from the photos posted in the latest album. Sue found a lot of conch shells left on the Cay after the fishermen removed the conch from the shell. We also saw a large (3 or 4 feet across) stingray but couldn’t get a photo. We also saw what looked like stone crabs in the shallow water along the shore but so far few fish. I got out the rod and cast a few times but nothing hit so I quit.
Today we moved on to Nassau and are now in the Nassau Harbor Club Marina. They have a fresh water pool so we took a swim before dinner. At the pool we met Christine Keen who with her husband Peter are aboard “White Wind”, a Hylas 44 and have been sailing for many years. Peter is back in the States for a brief business trip so we invited Christine to dinner and had a nice evening swapping sailing stories and other interesting career tales. We will stay at the marina until Monday when the local repair yard opens and we can explore getting the boat hauled and the propeller straightened and have someone look at the refrigeration.

Posted by Dick at 09:27 PM

The Jump Across

February 4th through 6th
We pulled the anchor and were underway by 6 am Tuesday the 4th for the 42-mile trip to Cat and Gun Cays. I had estimated the offset or “crab” angle to be a course of 110 degrees magnetic and it worked out almost exactly right. The wind was from the southeast and didn’t change to the southwest as predicted. As a result we couldn’t sail. As we entered the Gulfstream we saw many Portuguese Man (Men?) of War and schools of flying fish. The combination of SE wind and the current in the Gulfstream made it choppy and it got worse as we got closer to the Bahamas side. The wave patterns were confused and very steep so Omega was really rocking and rolling but no problems. We arrived right at the entrance to the cut and went behind Cat Cay in calm water to anchor in Honeymoon Harbor. The Bruce anchor dragged on the grass and hard sand bottom so I tried the CQR – also with no joy. I then moved the Danforth to the bow and tried it but it dragged too! When I retrieved it I found a 2-foot length of someone’s old anchor line and a lot of grass on it. After getting the junk off it, the next try with the Danforth was successful and we settled down for the night. We put up the “Q” flag (quarantine) that we have to fly until we clear customs. We have a half dozen other boats anchored here in Honeymoon Harbor with us – some also flying the Q. The local resort charges $50 to come to their dock and process through customs but we did it anyhow because there is a 48-hour maximum limit to check in.
Wednesday we started start the 70+ mile trip across the Great Bahamas Bank with an average depth of 10-12 feet to Chub Cay. The Banks are interesting and I do not understand the geology behind them. The water on the Miami side go to 500 feet deep and on the Atlantic is 3-4,000 feet deep. In the middle are the Bahamas with the highest point of land about 30 or 40 feet and these huge Banks with very consistent water depth of 10-12 feet. It is further from Bimini to Chub Cay across the Bank than is from Miami to Bimini! We anchored out on the bank last night with no land in sight! It was rock and roll time due to tidal currents and wind direction and I was up almost all night checking on the boat but all was fine. Sue seems to be able to sleep through almost anything! I get no cell phone signal here so we have not been able to let everyone know that we made it OK.
Today we motored another 30 miles to Chub Cay and bought a couple of $10 BATELCO phone cards ($1 per minute for calls to the US) and called Ethan and Liz to let them know we’re here. It is warm and we went for our first swim off the boat in crystal clear water with starfish all over the bottom! Speaking of bottoms, this is the first time I’ve had a chance to inspect the bottom of the boat since it was hauled in Norfolk and I discovered that one blade of the propeller has been bent badly on the leading edge. I recall a large “thump” going through the Dismal Swamp Canal and that might have been it. I will try to arrange a quick haul to remove and straighten the prop when we are in Nassau a few days from now. The bottom of the keel and rudder have also had the bottom paint scraped off where we “pushed” through several sandbars along the way! I can repaint these areas while the boat is out. The rest of the bottom paint looks good for its 3rd season. I didn’t see any growth or barnacles either. We had Boboli pizzas for dinner. They have worked out well on the boat and the personal size lets us each have our own “loaded” the way we like it.

Posted by Dick at 09:26 PM

The last Provisioning!

January 29th to February 3rd
The trip from Lake Boca Raton to Sylvia Lake (Ft. Lauderdale area) was another great day on the Intercoastal. There are LOTS of bridges here but we still were anchored in Sylvia Lake by mid afternoon. There is no place to go ashore here so we stayed on board for a quiet night. On the 30th we went out the Port Everglades inlet into the Atlantic and motor sailed to Miami. The trip into Miami through “Government Cut” was interesting with a large freighter following us in they really look big coming up behind you!) and the Fishers Island Ferry crossing ahead of us. We went north back up the ICW through the Venetian Causeway Bridge and then east towards Miami Beach where we anchored. Josh’s friend Dave Depilis met us and we went ashore to walk down Lincoln Avenue – the street has been closed off and is now a 4 or 6-block open walking “mall” area with restaurants and shops. It is a great people watching place and very nice. Friday we walked to Radio Shack to get the cable I need to be able to receive weather faxes from the SSB radio and then to the new ultra modern Publix that is just 2 blocks from our anchorage for more provisioning. Dave and his bride Gabriella had us to their new house for an excellent Friday night dinner and visit. Saturday we made another provisionong trip to Publix and at night we just hung out on the boat. Sunday made another provisioning trip to Publix. My son Rich arrived in town for a company sales meeting and he came aboard Sunday night for a nice visit. Monday we motored south Dinner Key Marina in Coconut Grove to top up with water, diesel, and ice. We then moved to “Noname Harbor” on the south end of Key Biscayne as our jump off point for the Bahamas. The weather forecasts for the last two days have indicated favorable conditions for the crossing!
February 4th through 6th
We pulled the anchor and were underway by 6 am Tuesday the 4th for the 42-mile trip to Cat and Gun Cays. I had estimated the offset or “crab” angle to be a course of 110 degrees magnetic and it worked out almost exactly right. The wind was from the southeast and didn’t change to the southwest as predicted. As a result we couldn’t sail. As we entered the Gulfstream we saw many Portuguese Man (Men?) of War and schools of flying fish. The combination of SE wind and the current in the Gulfstream made it choppy and it got worse as we got closer to the Bahamas side. The wave patterns were confused and very steep so Omega was really rocking and rolling but no problems. We arrived right at the entrance to the cut and went behind Cat Cay in calm water to anchor in Honeymoon Harbor. The Bruce anchor dragged on the grass and hard sand bottom so I tried the CQR – also with no joy. I then moved the Danforth to the bow and tried it but it dragged too! When I retrieved it I found a 2-foot length of someone’s old anchor line and a lot of grass on it. After getting the junk off it, the next try with the Danforth was successful and we settled down for the night. We put up the “Q” flag (quarantine) that we have to fly until we clear customs. We have a half dozen other boats anchored here in Honeymoon Harbor with us – some also flying the Q. The local resort charges $50 to come to their dock and process through customs but we did it anyhow because there is a 48-hour maximum limit to check in.
Wednesday we started start the 70+ mile trip across the Great Bahamas Bank with an average depth of 10-12 feet to Chub Cay. The Banks are interesting and I do not understand the geology behind them. The water on the Miami side go to 500 feet deep and on the Atlantic is 3-4,000 feet deep. In the middle are the Bahamas with the highest point of land about 30 or 40 feet and these huge Banks with very consistent water depth of 10-12 feet. It is further from Bimini to Chub Cay across the Bank than is from Miami to Bimini! We anchored out on the bank last night with no land in sight! It was rock and roll time due to tidal currents and wind direction and I was up almost all night checking on the boat but all was fine. Sue seems to be able to sleep through almost anything! I get no cell phone signal here so we have not been able to let everyone know that we made it OK.
Today we motored another 30 miles to Chub Cay and bought a couple of $10 BATELCO phone cards ($1 per minute for calls to the US) and called Ethan and Liz to let them know we’re here. It is warm and we went for our first swim off the boat in crystal clear water with starfish all over the bottom! Speaking of bottoms, this is the first time I’ve had a chance to inspect the bottom of the boat since it was hauled in Norfolk and I discovered that one blade of the propeller has been bent badly on the leading edge. I recall a large “thump” going through the Dismal Swamp Canal and that might have been it. I will try to arrange a quick haul to remove and straighten the prop when we are in Nassau a few days from now. The bottom of the keel and rudder have also had the bottom paint scraped off where we “pushed” through several sandbars along the way! I can repaint these areas while the boat is out. The rest of the bottom paint looks good for its 3rd season. I didn’t see any growth or barnacles either. We had Boboli pizzas for dinner. They have worked out well on the boat and the personal size lets us each have our own “loaded” the way we like it.
February 4th through 6th
We pulled the anchor and were underway by 6 am Tuesday the 4th for the 42-mile trip to Cat and Gun Cays. I had estimated the offset or “crab” angle to be a course of 110 degrees magnetic and it worked out almost exactly right. The wind was from the southeast and didn’t change to the southwest as predicted. As a result we couldn’t sail. As we entered the Gulfstream we saw many Portuguese Man (Men?) of War and schools of flying fish. The combination of SE wind and the current in the Gulfstream made it choppy and it got worse as we got closer to the Bahamas side. The wave patterns were confused and very steep so Omega was really rocking and rolling but no problems. We arrived right at the entrance to the cut and went behind Cat Cay in calm water to anchor in Honeymoon Harbor. The Bruce anchor dragged on the grass and hard sand bottom so I tried the CQR – also with no joy. I then moved the Danforth to the bow and tried it but it dragged too! When I retrieved it I found a 2-foot length of someone’s old anchor line and a lot of grass on it. After getting the junk off it, the next try with the Danforth was successful and we settled down for the night. We put up the “Q” flag (quarantine) that we have to fly until we clear customs. We have a half dozen other boats anchored here in Honeymoon Harbor with us – some also flying the Q. The local resort charges $50 to come to their dock and process through customs but we did it anyhow because there is a 48-hour maximum limit to check in.
Wednesday we started start the 70+ mile trip across the Great Bahamas Bank with an average depth of 10-12 feet to Chub Cay. The Banks are interesting and I do not understand the geology behind them. The water on the Miami side go to 500 feet deep and on the Atlantic is 3-4,000 feet deep. In the middle are the Bahamas with the highest point of land about 30 or 40 feet and these huge Banks with very consistent water depth of 10-12 feet. It is further from Bimini to Chub Cay across the Bank than is from Miami to Bimini! We anchored out on the bank last night with no land in sight! It was rock and roll time due to tidal currents and wind direction and I was up almost all night checking on the boat but all was fine. Sue seems to be able to sleep through almost anything! I get no cell phone signal here so we have not been able to let everyone know that we made it OK.
Today we motored another 30 miles to Chub Cay and bought a couple of $10 BATELCO phone cards ($1 per minute for calls to the US) and called Ethan and Liz to let them know we’re here. It is warm and we went for our first swim off the boat in crystal clear water with starfish all over the bottom! Speaking of bottoms, this is the first time I’ve had a chance to inspect the bottom of the boat since it was hauled in Norfolk and I discovered that one blade of the propeller has been bent badly on the leading edge. I recall a large “thump” going through the Dismal Swamp Canal and that might have been it. I will try to arrange a quick haul to remove and straighten the prop when we are in Nassau a few days from now. The bottom of the keel and rudder have also had the bottom paint scraped off where we “pushed” through several sandbars along the way! I can repaint these areas while the boat is out. The rest of the bottom paint looks good for its 3rd season. I didn’t see any growth or barnacles either. We had Boboli pizzas for dinner. They have worked out well on the boat and the personal size lets us each have our own “loaded” the way we like it.
February 4th through 6th
We pulled the anchor and were underway by 6 am Tuesday the 4th for the 42-mile trip to Cat and Gun Cays. I had estimated the offset or “crab” angle to be a course of 110 degrees magnetic and it worked out almost exactly right. The wind was from the southeast and didn’t change to the southwest as predicted. As a result we couldn’t sail. As we entered the Gulfstream we saw many Portuguese Man (Men?) of War and schools of flying fish. The combination of SE wind and the current in the Gulfstream made it choppy and it got worse as we got closer to the Bahamas side. The wave patterns were confused and very steep so Omega was really rocking and rolling but no problems. We arrived right at the entrance to the cut and went behind Cat Cay in calm water to anchor in Honeymoon Harbor. The Bruce anchor dragged on the grass and hard sand bottom so I tried the CQR – also with no joy. I then moved the Danforth to the bow and tried it but it dragged too! When I retrieved it I found a 2-foot length of someone’s old anchor line and a lot of grass on it. After getting the junk off it, the next try with the Danforth was successful and we settled down for the night. We put up the “Q” flag (quarantine) that we have to fly until we clear customs. We have a half dozen other boats anchored here in Honeymoon Harbor with us – some also flying the Q. The local resort charges $50 to come to their dock and process through customs but we did it anyhow because there is a 48-hour maximum limit to check in.
Wednesday we started start the 70+ mile trip across the Great Bahamas Bank with an average depth of 10-12 feet to Chub Cay. The Banks are interesting and I do not understand the geology behind them. The water on the Miami side go to 500 feet deep and on the Atlantic is 3-4,000 feet deep. In the middle are the Bahamas with the highest point of land about 30 or 40 feet and these huge Banks with very consistent water depth of 10-12 feet. It is further from Bimini to Chub Cay across the Bank than is from Miami to Bimini! We anchored out on the bank last night with no land in sight! It was rock and roll time due to tidal currents and wind direction and I was up almost all night checking on the boat but all was fine. Sue seems to be able to sleep through almost anything! I get no cell phone signal here so we have not been able to let everyone know that we made it OK.
Today we motored another 30 miles to Chub Cay and bought a couple of $10 BATELCO phone cards ($1 per minute for calls to the US) and called Ethan and Liz to let them know we’re here. It is warm and we went for our first swim off the boat in crystal clear water with starfish all over the bottom! Speaking of bottoms, this is the first time I’ve had a chance to inspect the bottom of the boat since it was hauled in Norfolk and I discovered that one blade of the propeller has been bent badly on the leading edge. I recall a large “thump” going through the Dismal Swamp Canal and that might have been it. I will try to arrange a quick haul to remove and straighten the prop when we are in Nassau a few days from now. The bottom of the keel and rudder have also had the bottom paint scraped off where we “pushed” through several sandbars along the way! I can repaint these areas while the boat is out. The rest of the bottom paint looks good for its 3rd season. I didn’t see any growth or barnacles either. We had Boboli pizzas for dinner. They have worked out well on the boat and the personal size lets us each have our own “loaded” the way we like it. February 4th through 6th
We pulled the anchor and were underway by 6 am Tuesday the 4th for the 42-mile trip to Cat and Gun Cays. I had estimated the offset or “crab” angle to be a course of 110 degrees magnetic and it worked out almost exactly right. The wind was from the southeast and didn’t change to the southwest as predicted. As a result we couldn’t sail. As we entered the Gulfstream we saw many Portuguese Man (Men?) of War and schools of flying fish. The combination of SE wind and the current in the Gulfstream made it choppy and it got worse as we got closer to the Bahamas side. The wave patterns were confused and very steep so Omega was really rocking and rolling but no problems. We arrived right at the entrance to the cut and went behind Cat Cay in calm water to anchor in Honeymoon Harbor. The Bruce anchor dragged on the grass and hard sand bottom so I tried the CQR – also with no joy. I then moved the Danforth to the bow and tried it but it dragged too! When I retrieved it I found a 2-foot length of someone’s old anchor line and a lot of grass on it. After getting the junk off it, the next try with the Danforth was successful and we settled down for the night. We put up the “Q” flag (quarantine) that we have to fly until we clear customs. We have a half dozen other boats anchored here in Honeymoon Harbor with us – some also flying the Q. The local resort charges $50 to come to their dock and process through customs but we did it anyhow because there is a 48-hour maximum limit to check in.
Wednesday we started start the 70+ mile trip across the Great Bahamas Bank with an average depth of 10-12 feet to Chub Cay. The Banks are interesting and I do not understand the geology behind them. The water on the Miami side go to 500 feet deep and on the Atlantic is 3-4,000 feet deep. In the middle are the Bahamas with the highest point of land about 30 or 40 feet and these huge Banks with very consistent water depth of 10-12 feet. It is further from Bimini to Chub Cay across the Bank than is from Miami to Bimini! We anchored out on the bank last night with no land in sight! It was rock and roll time due to tidal currents and wind direction and I was up almost all night checking on the boat but all was fine. Sue seems to be able to sleep through almost anything! I get no cell phone signal here so we have not been able to let everyone know that we made it OK.
Today we motored another 30 miles to Chub Cay and bought a couple of $10 BATELCO phone cards ($1 per minute for calls to the US) and called Ethan and Liz to let them know we’re here. It is warm and we went for our first swim off the boat in crystal clear water with starfish all over the bottom! Speaking of bottoms, this is the first time I’ve had a chance to inspect the bottom of the boat since it was hauled in Norfolk and I discovered that one blade of the propeller has been bent badly on the leading edge. I recall a large “thump” going through the Dismal Swamp Canal and that might have been it. I will try to arrange a quick haul to remove and straighten the prop when we are in Nassau a few days from now. The bottom of the keel and rudder have also had the bottom paint scraped off where we “pushed” through several sandbars along the way! I can repaint these areas while the boat is out. The rest of the bottom paint looks good for its 3rd season. I didn’t see any growth or barnacles either. We had Boboli pizzas for dinner. They have worked out well on the boat and the personal size lets us each have our own “loaded” the way we like it.

Posted by Dick at 09:25 PM